Monthly Archives: July 2013

Influence of Closed Chain Vs Open Chain Exercises in Patients with Chronic Ankle Arthritis


Vol 1 | Issue 1 | July - Sep 2013 | page 12-13 | Shah TH, Raman SK, Shah KC.


Author:Tapan Haresh Shah1, Siva Kumar Raman2, Kunal  Chandrakant Shah3

1B.PT, M.PT (Musculoskeletal & Sports) Vikas College of Physiotherapy, Mangalore, India.
2B.PT, M.PT Professor Vikas College Of Physiotherapy, Mangalore, India.
3MS Ortho. Sancheti Institute for Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Pune, India.

Institute at which research was conducted: Vikas College of Physiotherapy, Mangalore, India.
University Affiliation of Thesis: Rajiv Gandhi university of Health Sciences.
Year of Acceptance: 2012

Address of Correspondence
Dr Tapan Shah
E/41 Mukand Society, vrindavan, L.B.SMarg, Ghatkopar (West), Mumbai 400086.
Maharashtra, India.
,E mail: tapanshah41@gmail.com


 Abstract

Background: Chronic ankle arthritis is often managed by exercises. But there is no adequate literature about the superiority of CKC exercise over OKC exercise in reducing pain, improving ankle ROM and increasing single leg stance duration in ankle arthritis. Hence this study is attempted to determine the efficacy of CKC exercise over OKC exercise in chronic ankle arthritis.
Materials and methods: The study included 30 (n = 30) subjects who ranged in age from 40 to 60 years of both genders with chronic ankle arthritis. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two groups, each group consisting of 15 subjects. Group I was instructed to perform CKC ankle exercise. Group II was instructed to perform CKC ankle exercise. Before the beginning of the trial and at end of six weeks pain using VAS, ankle JROM using universal goniometer and single leg stance duration were measured.
Result: The initial evaluation showed that, there is no significant difference between the two groups for all the variables measured. The post-test evaluation showed a statistically significant (P< 0.05) increase in the pain reduction, ankle JROM and single leg stance duration within the groups.
Conclusion: This study led to the conclusion that CKC ankle exercise and OKC ankle exercise are equally effective in pain reduction, and improving ankle JROM and single leg stance duration in chronic ankle arthritis.

Keywords: Ankle arthritis, Open kinetic chain exercise, Closed kinetic chain exercise, Ankle rehabilitation.

                                                        THESIS SUMMARY                                                             

Introduction:

Primary osteoarthritis in the ankle is rare, and that secondary osteoarthritis that follows rotational ankle fractures or recurrent ligamentous instability is much more common. The primary aim of treatment is to provide pain relief. This may be attempted through the use of offloading strategies such as assistive devices. A single point cane can decrease vertical loading by 11–25%. Total contact casts, patellar tendon bearing braces, and removable walking boots have been shown to offload the foot. However, they induce asymmetrical loading, and are often accompanied by poor patient compliance. Application of heat modalities and exercise are the mainstay of treatment for increasing muscle strength, JROM and function. Though exercise is the mainstay in the management of chronic ankle arthritis, there is no consensus regarding the efficacy of closed chain exercise(CKC) ankle exercise and open chain exercise(OKC) exercise. Also majority of literature pertains to knee joint and there is a dearth of studies on ankle joint CKC exercise. Hence we attempt to determine the efficacy of CKC ankle exercise in the management of chronic ankle arthritis.

Materials and methods:

We performed a prospective randomised control trial and included 30 (n = 30) subjects who ranged in age from 40 to 60 years of both genders with chronic ankle arthritis. All patients were symptomatic for more than 3 months. The exclusion criteria were History of trauma to the lower limbs history of lower limb surgery, radiating pain from lumbosacral disorders, generalized inflammatory disorders associated with the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's disease, gout, or lupus, use of pain control (analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and steroids at the time of recruitment.

Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two groups, each group consisting of 15 subjects. Group I was instructed to perform CKC ankle exercise. Group II was instructed to perform CKC ankle exercise. Before the beginning of the trial and at end of six weeks pain using VAS, ankle JROM using universal goniometer and single leg stance duration were measured. The data collected by VAS and single leg stance was analyzed using non-parametric tests as the data were ordinal in nature. The intra group pre and post-test data was analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test, while the post-test inter group data was be analyzed Mannwhitney U test. The data collected by goniometric measurement of the ankle joint was analyzed using paired t test for intra group and unpaired t test for inter group.

Results:
The initial evaluation showed that, there is no significant difference (P> 0.05) between the two groups for all the variables measured. The post-test evaluation showed a statistically significant (P< 0.05) increase in the pain reduction, ankle JROM and single leg stance duration within the groups. A post-test comparison between the groups showed that there is no statistically significant (P>0.05) between the groups.

Conclusion:
This study led to the conclusion that CKC ankle exercise and OKC ankle exercise are equally effective in pain reduction, and improving ankle JROM and single leg stance duration in chronic ankle arthritis. However a long term intervention and regular follow up over an extended period of time are necessary to interpret the results reliably.

Key Words:
Ankle arthritis, Open kinetic chain exercise, Closed kinetic chain exercise, Ankle rehabilitation.

Bibliography:

1.Praemer AP, Furner S, Rice DP. Musculoskeletal Conditions in the United States. Rosemont, Illinois: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 1999. p. 182.
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3.Demetriades L, Strauss E, Gallina J. Osteoarthritis of the Ankle Joint. Clin Orthop. 1998;349:28–42.
4.Wyss C, Zollinger H. The causes of subsequent arthrodesis of the ankle joint. Acta Orthop Belg. 1991;57(suppl 1):22–27.
5.Taga I, Shino K, Inoue M, Nakata K, Maeda A. Articular cartilage lesions in ankles with lateral ligament injury: An arthroscopic study. Am J Sports Med. 1993;21:120–126.
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8.Aragaki DR, Nasmyth MC, Schultz SC, et al. Immediate effects of contralateral and ipsilateral cane use on normal adult gait. PM R 2009; 1:208–213.
9.DiLiberto FE, Baumhauer JF, Wilding GE, et al. Alterations in plantar pressure with different walking boot designs. Foot Ankle Int 2007; 28:55–60.
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15.Morrissey MC, Drechsler WI, Morrissey D, Knight PR, Armstrong PW, McAuliffe TB: Effects of distally fixated versus nondistally fixated leg extensor resistance training on knee pain in the early period after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Phys. Ther. 2002; 82:35-43.
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How to Cite this Article: Shah TH, Raman SK, Shah KC. Influence of Closed Chain Vs Open Chain Exercises in Patients with Chronic Ankle Arthritis. Journal Medical Thesis 2013  July-Sep; 1(1):12-13

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Art 6 JMT July Sep 2013

 

Clinical Study of Valvular Heart Disease


Vol 1 | Issue 1 | July - Sep 2013 | page 8-11 | Lakhani SV & Joglekar VK


Author: Siddharth Vinod Lakhani1, Vijay  Krishna Joglekar1

1Medicine Dept, GMC and Sir JJ Hospital, Byculla, Mumbai, India.

Institute at which research was conducted: Grant Medical College & Sir JJ Hospital, Mumbai, India
University Affiliation of Thesis: Maharashtra University of Heath Sciences
Year of Acceptance: 2013

Address of Correspondence
Dr Siddharth Vinod Lakhani
401-402 Chetan Bldg, Opp Popular Hotel, Hingwala Lane, Ghatkopar East.mumbai 400077
E mail: siddharthlakhani1@gmail.com


 Abstract

Background: A thorough understanding of the various valvular disorders is important to aid in the management of patients with VHD. We herby thus study various presentations, distributions , complications and severity of patients presenting with valvular heart disease.
Materials and methods: 250 patients with valvular heart disease were enrolled and studied for demographic details,clinical presentation and complications
Results: In study of 250 patients ,the most common valvular lesion was mitral regurgitation 114 (45.6%) out of which 75 (30%) were Isolated MR , MS with MR 30(12%) patients, MR with TR 7(2.8%) patients and MR with AR with TR 2(0.8%).other parameters as detailed in thesis.
Conclusion: Each valvular heart lesion presents with varied demographic characteristics with peculiar clinical presentation and complication rate.

Keywords: Valvular heart disease, demographics, presentations, complications, severity

                                                        THESIS SUMMARY                                                             

Introduction:

Valvular heart disease(VHD) is result from damage or deterioration of the valve structures leading to some degree of stenosis, incompetence or both .Although valvular heart disease is less frequent than coronary disease,heart failure or hypertension, it is of reasons because firstly VHD Is still common and often requires intervention and secondly important changes has occurred as regards to presentation and complication over recent years.A better understanding of the natural history coupled with the major advances in diagnostic imaging, interventional cardiology ,and surgical approaches have resulted in accurate diagnosis and appropriate selection of patients for therapeutic interventions. A thorough understanding of the various valvular disorders is important to aid in the management of patients with VHD.We herby thus study various presentations, distributions , complications and severity of patients presenting with valvular heart disease.

Materials and methods:

We enrolled 250 cases of valvular heart disease patients in the present study. Patients with native valvular heart disease of age > 12 years. cases of newly diagnosed adult patients with valvular abnormalities presenting to the medicine and Cardiology Unit from May 2010 to October 2012. All patients aged 12 years and above are considered 'adult' and are managed by the adult Medicine. There is no upper age limit. A detailed clinical history including including various symptoms , past history of rheumatic fever ,followed by systemic examination was done. Specific findings of rhythm of pulse rate, blood pressure , raised jugular venous pulse, oedema feet , were noted for each patient. A detailed cardiovascular systemic examination for specific findings of character of apex beat ,character of S1 ,and S2 , type of murmur were noted for all patients.A chest x ray postero anterior view was done in all patients and Cardio thoracic ratio was noted in all patients.A 12-lead electrocardiogram was done in all the patients to look for rate, rhythm, chamber enlargement/hypertrophy .Each patient underwent echocardiographic evaluation and parameters like Left atrial (LA) dimensions, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) , left ventricular end diastolic dimension (LVIDD) , left ventricular end systolic dimension (LVIDS), valve area for stenotic lesions , pulmonary artery pressure (PASP) , for stenotic lesions mean gradient was calculated , and for regurgitate lesions Vena contracta and jet width was calculated.

Results:
Tin study of 250 patients ,the most common valvular lesion was mitral regurgitation 114 (45.6%) out of which 75 (30%) were Isolated MR , MS with MR 30(12%) patients, MR with TR 7(2.8%) patients and MR with AR with TR 2(0.8%). There were 78 (31.2%) cases of mitral stenosis ,with 25(10%) of Isolated MS, MS with MR 30(12%), MS with TR 13(5.2%), MS with AS 5(2%), MS with AR 3 (1.2%) and MS with AR with TR 2 (0.8%). There were 68 (27.2%) cases of aortic regurgitation with 35(14%) of Isolated AR and 25 (10%) of patients with AS with AR, 58(23.2%) cases of aortic stenosis out of which 28 (11.2%) oatients with Isolated AS. There were 24 (9.6%) of tricuspid regurgitation all associated with mitral or aortic lesions and no cases of tricuspid stenosis . It is noted that Isolated MS (25) was more common in females (15) than male (10) patients, in all other cases the lesions were more common in male patients.In case of mixed valve lesions MS with AR (3) was also more common in female (2) patients , all other cases of mixed lesions were more common in male patients. Dyspnea was present in 22(88.8%) patients.Dyspnea was present in 100% cases of Isolated MS, with 5(20%) patients of class I dyspnea, 7 (28%) patients with class II , 11 (44%) patients with class III dyspnea , and 2 (8%) patients with class IV dyspnea.In cases of Isolated MR dyspnea was present in 94.7% patients with 14 (18.7%) patients with class I dyspnea , 32(42.7%) patients with class II , 21(28%) patients of class III, and 4(5.3%) patients with class IV dyspnea. 4 (5.3% ) patients did not have dyspnea. In cases of Isolated AR dyspnea was present in 88.6% patients with 5 (14.3%) patients with class I dyspnea , 16(45.7%) patients with class II , 9(25.7%) patients of class III, and 1 (2.9%) patients with class IV dyspnea. 4 (11.4% ) patients did not have dyspnea . In cases of Isolated AS dyspnea was present in 82.1% patients with 2 (7.1%) patients with class I dyspnea , 16(57.1%) patients with class II , 5 (17.9%) patients of class III, and no patients with class IV dyspnea. 5 (17.9% ) patients did not have dyspnea. In cases of mixed lesions dyspnea was present in 82.7% patients class I dyspnea with 7 (8 %) patients Out of which 3 were with AS with AR , 3 with MR.class II dyspnea 33 (37.9%) patients with out of which, 13 were with MS with MR , 6 with MS with TR , 1 with MS with AS , 8 AS with AR, 2 with MR with TR, 2 with MS with AR with TR and 1 with MS with AR.

Conclusion:
Most common age of presentation of valvular heart disease was 41-50 years (35.2%). Male to female ratio was 1.48 :1. The most common valvular lesion was mitral regurgitation in 45.6% patients. Valvular lesions were more common in male patients except in cases of Isolated MS and MS with MR were there was female predominance. Most common presenting symptom was dyspnea (88.8%) , second most common palpitations (79.2%) ,followed by chest pain (56%) and syncope (4.8%). Syncope was seen mainly in cases of Isolated AS 10 (35.7%). Pulse was irregularly irregular in 55 (22%) patients ,. Irregularly irregular pulse was more common in patients with MS (28%). Mean systolic blood pressure(in mm of Hg) in Isolated MS is 121.68 , 125.52 in Isolated MR , 125.26 in Isolated AR , 125.93 in Isolated AS , 122.02 in mixed valve lesion.Mean diastolic blood pressure(in mm of Hg) in Isolated MS is 73.60 , 78.77 in Isolated MR , 45.80 in Isolated AR, 76.50 in Isolated MS and 70.23 in mixed valve lesion. On ECG Atrial fibrillation was more common in patients with Isolated MS (28%) P Mitrale was more common with Isolated MS (93.33%), P Pulmonale was More common in patients with Isolated MS (36%).RVH was most common with Isolated MS 48%, LVH was most common in patients with Isolated AS 64.29%.on ECHO Mean LA Size(in mm) in Isolated MS is 45.36 , Isolated MR 42.20 , Isolated AR 28.26 ,Isolated AS 27.21. Mean LVIDD(in mm) in Isolated MS is 46.40 , Isolated MR 54.61 , Isolated AR 28.26 ,Isolated AS 27.21. Mean LVIDS(in mm) in Isolated MS is 30.24 , Isolated MR 44.71 , Isolated AR 45.66 ,Isolated AS 41.25. Mean Ejection fraction in Isolated MS is 59.44 , Isolated MR 59.01 , Isolated AR 58.54 ,Isolated AS 60.71. Mean mitral valve area in Isolated MS is 1.16 , mean aortic valve area in Isolated AS 1.29. Mean gradient across mitral area in Isolated MS is 9.56 , Mean gradient across Aortic area in Isolated AS is 32.39. Mean PASP in Isolated MS is 43.60 , Isolated MR 37.57, Isolated AR 28.06 ,Isolated AS 30.25. Mean vena contracted in case of Isolated MR 0.39, in Isolated AR 0.41 , Mean jet width Isolated MR 28.09, Isolated AR 41.91. Most common complication was congestive heart failure 26.8% , followed by atrial fibrillation 22 % , followed by infective endocarditis 6.8% , and stroke (hemiparesis) in 2%.

Key Words:
Valvular heart disease, demographics, presentations, complications, severity

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How to Cite this Article: Lakhani SV & Joglekar VK. Clinical Study of Valvular Heart Disease. Journal Medical Thesis 2013 July-Sep; 1(1):8-11

Download Full Text PDF   |  Download Full Thesis  


Art 5 JMT July Sep 2013


Guest Editorial : Dr VM Iyer


Vol 1 | Issue 1 | July - Sep 2013 | page 6 | Iyer VM

doi:


Author: Dr Vishwanath Iyer

Orthopaedic Surgeon
Ex HOD – Orthopaedics – GMC, Solapur
Special Advisory Board - Journal of Medical Thesis
Email: drvishwanath@gmail.com


 It is very heartening to see that the Indian Orthopaedic Research Group has reached another milestone by starting this new venture of Journal of Medical Thesis. It is also unique in that no one else has thought about such an EFFORT before. This will help bring to light so much good work being done by the young postgraduates. It is also notable that this journal will include not just orthopaedic theses but also those from the other disciplines.

In our country “thesis writing” is a prerequisite before appearing for any postgraduate examination. In many western countries, thesis writing and presentation is necessary even before getting the undergraduate degree. The idea of making the student write a thesis is to familiarize the student with the methodology and experience to write research papers later in life. Not all the theses written are good, because the student has not had time needed, because he did not have enough material and because he was never aware of the methodology or statistical analysis and it was done in a hurry.
But there are students who have been guided properly, have written excellent thesis and have drawn very useful conclusions. Such theses, which would make very good research papers, are often forgotten and lying in the university uncared for. Information on what was done and what was found in these studies are lost forever to doctors and researchers, leading to bad treatment decisions, missed opportunities for good medicine, and the same study being repeated.
This is because thesis writing was just a duty that a student had to fulfill. Occasionally the professor (Guide) would send it later for publication in a journal, sometimes even omitting the student's name in the list of authors.
All these would change with this new venture of Indian Orthopaedic Research Group. It conducts regular programmes familiarizing the student with the exact methodology to prepare a thesis. The students would be motivated to select an appropriate topic and work on it sincerely and write the thesis according to the conditions stipulated.
Once it becomes a routine to submit the thesis to this “ Journal of Medical Thesis” the candidate will be more stimulated, careful and will do a sincere study. The work done with all the sincerity will be worthwhile publishing in the journal and it will be a reward to the student.
I wish that the “Journal of Medical Thesis” will continue without any obstacles.


How to Cite this Article: VM Iyer.  JMT Guest Editorial: Dr V M Iyer. Journal Medical Thesis 2013  July-Sep; 1(1):6

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Art 3 Guest Editorial JMT July Sep 2013

Journal of Medical Thesis: Creation of A Unique Paradigm – Principles and Vision


Vol 1 | Issue 1 | July - Sep 2013 | page 1-3 | Shyam AK


Author: Dr Ashok Shyam

Editor Journal of Medical Thesis; Email: drashokshyam@yahoo.co.uk


 What is Research?

The answer to this question can be variously defined and described but simply put Research is 'Pursuit of Knowledge'. In scientific academia there are three steps to build knowledge viz data acquisition, processing the data to generate information and analyzing the information to produce knowledge. All three components are important parts of the process of pursuit of Knowledge. Now as a part of medical curriculum every student has to undertake a thesis which involves all three stages of knowledge building. The problem here is that this data (due to some unforeseen reason) fails to show up in public domain. With public domain I also mean easily accessible portals and not dusty offices and store rooms. The definition of public domain has changed in recent years and for academia it means availability of the work on World Wide Web. The non availability of theses on the internet makes them 'Grey Literature' as pointed by Ms Punita Solanki in one of the guest Editorial in this issue [1]. This lack of accessibility leads to certain unique problems in Knowledge building process as listed below

Gaps in the Collage: Currently in the modern framework of Pursuit of Knowledge, the term Evidence based medicine (EBM) has come into importance. Although I personally may not totally agree with all the principles of EBM, but the point it makes is that it's important to create a 'Collage' of all available research in form of a systematic review or Metanalysis. The data for the Metanalysis comes from many different studies and the strength of Metanalysis is its numbers. More the number of patients more strong are the results. Metanalysis search is generally done on the internet through various databases like Pubmed, Ovid, google etc. Although some Metanalysis do review hard bound literature, yet most will restrict themselves to online available articles. Thus if thesis are not available online they cannot be included in the EBM search. Although some may argue that thesis are of low quality, but then it is a 'Research' document. Even if the data is small or not designed properly, the patients are assessed and data is there and according to the research question and design of Metanalysis, this data can be used in preparing the Evidence Collage. Also since Evidence is built on 'Available' data this may seriously bias the results of EBM statistics. Say for example I know that a lot of thesis have been done on proximal femur fractures. Almost every year around 20 to 30 students of orthopaedics do a thesis on proximal Femur fracture in India and they enroll around 50 patient on an average. If we take an average of last 10 years with 20 students every years the potential database includes ten thousand patients of Proximal femur fracture. Also if we start considering other countries, I am sure the numbers will be much more. The amount of data that we are missing here is humungous and if it was made available, it would have definitely changed the face of current knowledge about proximal femur fractures. Publication of these thesis in Journal of Medical thesis will help build a body of literature which will definitely add to Evidence by it sheer numbers. Journal of Medical Thesis is here to build this parallel body of Literature and in years to come we will definitely change the decision making scenario

Circling one's Tail: When we start a research project one of the first step is reviewing the literature to find the current status on the research question we want to pursue. Like the above example of proximal femur fractures, I have seen same topics repeated year after year. The problem is while reviewing the literature (which is done online) the thesis of the past year do not show up on search engines and hence the student chooses a topic thinking that it has not been done in the past, thus duplicating the research. New research is built upon past research like building a wall one brick by brick. Or rather like a jigsaw puzzle, where the entire scenario of a disease entity is a Jigsaw and by doing research we create small pieces that fit into a jigsaw. Duplication of research is like creating multiple copies of same piece of jigsaw every year and the reason for it is that every new student is unaware that this particular piece is already fabricated by a candidate in last year. This not only creates multiple copies of jigsaw more importantly it obstructs creation of new parts of the framework. So if a student is aware that this particular topic is done multiple times, he and his guide will not repeat it and instead pursue a fresh topic which can add to the process of generating new answers. Thus non publication of thesis not only lead us to multiplicity of theses but also prevents generation of new hypothesis and studies. It's like we keep on chasing our tails every year and remain on the same spot without progressing at the speed we are capable of.

Loss of Resources: As pointed above multiplicity of thesis after certain point will stop adding value to the evidence collage and will just be a waste of resources. The thesis requires a lot of time and dedication from everyone involved and if it is not going to add any value to the existing body of knowledge all this effort will be wasted. This waste of resources can be avoided by publishing the thesis in JMT and this can be achieved more effectively by increased collaboration amongst academic bodies and JMT. At JMT we encourage increased collaboration not only within one faculty or institute but between multiple faculties and many institutes thus effectively creating a strong academic network. With this in mind we will like to invite Individual departments, Medical colleges, Institutes, Universities and other academic bodies to associate with Journal of Medical thesis. All associated bodies will be duly acknowledged on our website and enlisted in the Journal. If you wish your department, institute or university to be affiliated with JMT, please write to us directly at journalmedicalthesis@gmail.com

Failure to build Value: This is one of the most important point. When I visited my medical college few years back, I made a point to go and look for our thesis. They were all there in the corner of the library and looked as if no one has ever touched them. The emotion it identified with was not remotely of 'value'. Generating personal value into things we do is a natural human trait. If we are investing time and effort into a project we wish to create value out of it. Seeing my thesis lying in a dusty cupboard did not give me any sense of value created. Again another aspect of medical research is patients' point of view. When we conduct out thesis and enroll patients, most patients agree to get enrolled as they think that their participation in research will create something of value and will help in progress of knowledge and might help the next patient to get better treatment. If we fail to add this data to the existing knowledge database, we also fail to create value for the patients who co-operated with us. This according to me also breaches Ethical borders and our promise to patients enrolled in the thesis. This I feel is one of the strong reason why all thesis should be published and brought into public domain. The third point of value lies with the student. Thesis is often the first research projects done by a medical student (at least in India) and with his limited knowledge and guidance from his guide he tries to make an effort in this new arena of medical research. Like any new entrepreneur he needs encouragement at every step. If his first step in medical research namely his thesis fails to create any value, I doubt he will ever try to take up another project. On the other hand if his thesis does get published and does create value (may be small or miniscule), it will definitely provide encouragement toward taking further steps in research. As said above Research is Pursuit of knowledge and having more researchers pursuing knowledge is not only better for the subject but also better for our patients. Creating value out of thesis is one of the core principles of JMT and I believe it will be the first step in creating Clinicians-Scientists which is a breed that needs to be nurtured for progress of our faculty.

So by above logic, thesis seem to be quite important and can add greatly to academic literature, so why have they been given step-motherly treatment by the current framework of literature. Possibly, since this is the first attempt by the researcher, it is considered to be having poor design and other issues as pointed out by Dr VM Iyer in his guest editorial [2]. However I feel if we start putting value in these thesis by publishing them, the future students will also start putting in more efforts and making their thesis more relevant. This it's a like a positive feedback loop; we give thesis value by publishing and students by appreciating this value put more effort in making thesis better. This is positive feedback is one of the core principles on which Journal of Medical thesis is based on. We hope this will break the existing Negative feedback loop for thesis, prevent duplication of thesis, avoid plagiarism and also encourage students towards generating better thesis. Also as mentioned by our Associate Editor Dr Hrutvij Bhatt in his Guest Editorial [3] JMT will also envisioned to provide help to students in terms of organizing thesis workshops and online courses. Thus JMT will not only be a journal but will be a complete portal for Medial thesis, providing assistance to young researchers and helping create quality research. Thus JMT will be creating a Unique Paradigm with strong core principles and innovative visions for the future of medical thesis.

This is the inaugural issue of Journal of Medical thesis and includes thesis from various faculties of medicine, including orthopaedics, general medicine, general surgery, anesthesia and physiotherapy. We have a star studded Editorial board with more than 80 faculties from almost all areas of medicine. I would take this opportunity to thank the editorial board members for their co-operation and encouragements and we all look forward to achieving the goals we have set for JMT. The format of JMT looks beautiful with authors photographs and includes and abstract and thesis summary. The full thesis along will the data chart is also available online.
We are open to suggestions and if you wish please write a letter to Editor to us (details of submission on website www.journalmedicalthesis.com ). Do also visit us on facebook and twitter where we will be posting regular updates about the Journal. With first issue online we have send the documents for Indexing of JMT and soon will receive ISSN number and other indexing. We have just started this journey and I am sure there will be shortcomings in the beginning but I assure you that we are here to stay and with help from our editorial board, authors and readers we will definitely achieve what we have envisioned and possibly more. This is a collective small step towards a big leap together.
With this I leave you to enjoy the First Issue of Journal of Medical thesis.

Bibliography:

1. Solanki PV. JMT Guest Editorial : Punita V. Solanki. Journal Medical Thesis 2013 July-Sep; 1(1):4-5
2. VM Iyer. JMT Guest Editorial: Dr V M Iyer. Journal Medical Thesis 2013 July-Sep; 1(1):6
3. H Bhatt. JMT Guest Editorial : Dr Hrutvij Bhatt. Journal Medical Thesis 2013 July-Sep; 1(1):7


How to Cite this Article: Shyam AK. Editorial: Journal of Medical Thesis: Creation of A Unique Paradigm - Principles and Vision. Journal Medical Thesis 2013 July-Sep; 1(1):1-3.

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Art 1 Editorial JMT July Sep 2013

 


 

July – Sep 2013 | Vol 1 | Issue 1

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL THESIS

ISSN     2347 -  5595 

VOLUME 1  |  ISSUE 1 | July – Sept  2013


 

Table of Content

Cover Page                                                                             

First Page                                                                               

Editorial Board                                                                        

Guidelines to Authors                                                             

Table of Content                                                                    

Editorial


Journal of Medical Thesis: Creation of A Unique Paradigm- Principles and Vision

Dr Ashok K Shyam  

[Full Text HTML]      [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/001]


Guest Editorial


Punita V. Solanki

[Full Text HTML]      [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/002]


Dr VM Iyer

[Full Text HTML]      [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/003]


Dr Hrutvij Bhatt

[Full Text HTML]      [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/004]


Articles


Clinical Study of Valvular Heart Disease

Siddharth Vinod Lakhani, Vijay  Krishna Joglekar

[Full Text HTML]    [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/005]


Influence of Closed Chain Vs Open Chain Exercises in Patients with Chronic Ankle Arthritis

Tapan Haresh Shah , Siva Kumar Raman , Kunal Chandrakant Shah

[Full Text HTML]  [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/006]


The Evaluation of Intrathecal Morphine for Post Operative Analgesia in Vaginal Hysterectomy

Darshan Ashvin Trivedi , Harsha Patel , Prachi Kunal Shah

[Full Text HTML]   [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/007]


An Interventional Randomized Study to Evaluate a new Supraglottic Airway Device (I-gel) in Comparison with the Classical LMA

Rachana A Chandura , Bansari Naresh Kantharia , Prachi Kunal Shah

[Full Text HTML]   [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/008]


Functional Outcome of Total Knee Replacement in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis – A Prospective Study

K R Anil Kumar Reddy , A S Rao , AV Gurava Reddy

[Full Text HTML]      [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/009]


Prevalence and Analysis of Risk Factors of Osteoporosis in Persons of Above 40 Years Age Group in Amritsar - A Study of 500 Cases

Tarandeep Singh , Sohan Singh , Rakesh Sharma , Rajesh Kapila

[Full Text HTML]      [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/010]


Functional Evaluation of Proximal Humerus Fracture Managed by Locking Plate

Yogesh Savliram Gangurde , Neetin Pralhad Mahajan , Dhiraj Vithal Sonawane

[Full Text HTML]    [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/011]


A Comparative Study Of Chlorhexidine-Alcohol Versus Povidone-Iodine For Surgical Site Antisepsis In Clean & Clean Contaminated Cases

Ranjeet A. Patil , V. V. Gaikwad , R. M. Kulkarni

[Full Text HTML]    [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/012]


Transtibial vs Anatomical tunneling techniques for arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction in non-athletic population

Ali Electricwala , Chintamani Latkar , Sanjay Patil , Vilas Jog , Amit Mahajan , Shantanu Deshpande

[Full Text HTML]    [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/013]


Management of Diaphyseal Fractures of Long Bones in Children with Intramedullary Flexible Nail Nailing

Gaurav Sachdeva , Suhas Kamble

[Full Text HTML]    [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/014]


Letter to Editor


Kunal Shah and Prachi Shah

[Full Text HTML]      [Full Text PDF] [doi: 10.13107/jmt.2347-5595/015]


 

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